“And This too shall pass.”

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King Solomon chose to test his most loyal and trusted minister, Benaiah Ben Yehoyada, by asking of him an impossible task. He said to him, “Benaiah, there is a certain ring that I want you to bring to me. I wish to wear it for Sukkot which gives you six months to find it.

“If it exists anywhere on earth, your majesty,” replied Benaiah, “I will find it and bring it to you, but what makes the ring so special?” “It has magic powers,” answered the king. “If a happy man looks at it, he becomes sad, and if a sad man looks at it, he becomes happy.”

Solomon knew that no such ring existed in the world, but he wished to give his minister a little taste of humility.

Spring passed and then summer, and still Benaiah had no idea where he could find the ring. On the night before Sukkot, he decided to take a walk in one of he poorest quarters of Jerusalem. He passed by a merchant who had begun to set out the day’s wares on a shabby carpet. “Have you by any chance heard of a magic ring that makes the happy wearer forget his joy and the broken-hearted wearer forget his sorrows?” asked Benaiah.

He watched the grandfather take a plain gold ring from his carpet and engrave something on it. When Benaiah read the words on the ring, his face broke out in a wide smile.

That night the entire city welcomed in the holiday of Sukkot with great festivity. “Well, my friend,” said Solomon, “have you found what I sent you after?” All the ministers laughed and Solomon himself smiled.

To everyone’s surprise, Benaiah held up a small gold ring and declared, “Here it is, your majesty!” he gave him a ring with words engraved into it, with a condition that the King was not to read it out of curiosity.  Only if, in extreme danger, when the King finds himself alone and there seems to be no way out, only then he can read it. Solomon wore the ring without reading the engraving.

Some time later, the neighbors attacked the kingdom.  Solomon and his army fought bravely but lost the battle.  Solomon fled on his horse and the enemies followed him.  he found himself standing at the mouth of a deep ditch.  If he jumped into it, there would be no way out.  The sound of the enemy horses were approaching fast and he became restless.  There was nowhere else to go.

He remembered his ring and about the engraving.  He decided to read the message. Benaiah had written three Hebrew letters on the gold band: which began the words “Gam zeh ya’avor”

“This, too, shall pass.”

Solomon read it again and again until something struck him.  Yes! This, too, will pass.  Only a few days ago, I was enjoying my kingdom; I was the mightiest of all the Kings.  Yet today, the Kingdom and all its pleasures are gone.  I am trying to flee from my enemies.  But just as those days of luxuries have gone, this time of danger will pass, too.  Calm came over the King.  He remained still and silent.  He looked around at the place where he was standing and realized how beautiful it was.  He had never known that such a beautiful place existed in his Kingdom.

The revelation of the ring’s message had a great effect on him.  He relaxed and forgot about his pursuing enemies.  After a while, he realized that the noise of galloping horses had receded and that his enemies had lost him.

Solomon gathered himself and reorganised his shambled forces and fought again.  He defeated the enemy and reclaimed his empire.  When he returned to the city after the victory, he was received with much fanfare.  The whole capital was rejoicing and everyone was in a festive mood.

Then a ray of sunlight caught the King’s ring and sharply flashed into his eye reminding him of its message, “This, too, shall pass.”

He lowered his gaze and his valiant expression changed to one of humility.  He realized, again, that if this, too, is going to pass, it is not yours.  The defeat was not yours.  The victory was not yours.  You are just a player.  Everything passes by.  We are witnesses of all of this.  We are the beholders.

Solomon said :

Happiness comes and goes.  Sorrow comes and goes.  And Life?



This, too, shall pass.

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Author: Mohammed Jehan Khan

A Soldier of Fortune who born without a silver spoon in his arse. Google my name to know me more.

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